Apple Scab- winter work on orchards

This is the time of year that many things are done to achieve your garden goals for the following spring and summer Pruning , cutting back perennials and shrubs sets the garden for the coming growing season . Deciding on the sizes you want the elements in the garden to be is one way to look at pruning. It’s easier to access deciduous shrubs and trees when they are dormant,you can see the branching structure better. Look to where you cut them last year and how much growth they put on this year.Cut accordingly. Learning pruning is a lot about observation.

Transplanting and planting plants at this time is good as well,especially deciduous plants,shrubs,trees, even large roses can be moved. Really look at your garden as a whole, maybe even blur your vision to decide if you like the sizes things have become. You have the choice to prune shrubs whatever shape you want and they can live at. When you are learning pruning look at other peoples plants, shrubs and trees. Look at mature specimens. What size do you want to keep it? What size does it want to grow ? Even large plants can be kept small,but they will try to get to their normal size.Plant accordingly.

I’ve been doing a lot of research into apple and pear problems . Last year because it was so wet the apple scab really affected our trees, and others. This is a fungus which we are particularly susceptible to, living in a coastal environment. Fungus thrives in 50-80 degree weather, we typically rarely get higher or lower than these temps.

Preventative measures to take are to really clean up last years debris under the trees, for this carries the spores from the old leaves to the new leaves. So you rake, but look to see how much more there is to do to get it really clean, leaves not dropped or small dead apples. Then the best method to me seems to be a spray to start the tree off clean in the coming year. The more I research the more I think I’ll do a copper based spray at my house , mostly because I know my trees were infected last year and I think something serious needs to be done to clean them up. I’m going to spray an organically approved copper/ lime spray. With neem oil, another organic fungicide, but it’s also a spreader sticker( usually an oil which helps hold the spray on the tree even with some moisture). The spray needs to be timed to when the leaf shoot starts to come out. Then ten days ( five if it rains then) , and another ten days hopefully finishing with the petals off the new fruit. I want my trees to start off clean so I’m going to do one spray before that, early on in the next few weeks. Usually the trees should be pruned first before spraying, so it’s easier to spray, less to spray.

Because we are having such a warm, dry winter, we might have a very early bud break. Usually bud break is end of January for the earliest trees , early Feb. This will help keep the spores in check too, especially if it’s this dry ( I hope we get more rain soon though)

Spraying needs to be done on a dry day with no possibility of rain for 24 hours . Then sprayed on a sunny , windless, morning that’s when the plants stomatas are open and they will take in the most.

Local Food for the Holidays ! Whew, feeding 24 out of our garden for Thanksgiving weekend


So we made it to the deadline. The building was closed in and warm . We had a table , benches and a sink and even lights. Even though power was only run in with an extension cord.The oil lamps were lit.

Plus our ambitious goal to feed the masses from Tuesday through Saturday only from our garden or locally produced meat. Tuesday was bread preparation for Wednesdays early morning bake. Naturally fermented bread has many steps it goes through from the starter coming out of the frig. on Sunday, then added to and revitalized until Tuesday morning when it becomes the preferment, then dough, then loaves with many hours and folds in between. We ate Fish Chowder, rock fish traded for bread, our potatoes, parsley, garlic, and onions.Served with baby greens salad, purple onion and chopped parsley. Some of our sourdough bread from last week reheated.

Wednesday the oven was too hot. It was 800 degrees at 6am. I needed to get it down to 580 by 8am It keeps fooling us when it’s been fired for a few days, and it is already hot, it’s easy to overheat it. So we had time constraints, trying to deliver our orders so there were some dark sourdough loaves. Still everyone who came by or who arrived gorged themselves on fresh, warm bread. The blue cheese from Point Reyes with walnuts is always a favorite.

My idea was every family would take a loaf of bread, a dozen eggs from our chickens and jam for breakfasts. I think I got those to most everyone. Then Wednesday local cheese and warm bread with snacks for lunch. Dinner was lasagna from our homemade putanesca tomato sauce full of many garden vegetables and put up over the summer. The area we couldn’t keep up the local production was in the dairy. We bought in milk and cheese. Although a local dairy, commercially produced. Oh I would love it if you could again buy milk from small dairymen, but legislation trying to make us “safe” makes that near impossible. With the casserole we had salad with local beets and romanesco broccoli. Fresh bread and a tart made from redhaven peach and crabapple jam I made over the summer poured into a crust filled with frangipani, baked in the brick oven.
The Thanksgiving pies I made that day I was disappointed with because I baked them in a too hot oven, easy to do when the oven is wood fired. I made a butternut squash pie, from squash that I grew, and locally made mincemeat, from Lisa’a Luscious in Point Arena.

Thanksgiving arrived with the Turkeys my brother and his family picked up, I’d ordered them in August from Mendocino Organics, in Redwood Valley, pasture raised . They were the most beautiful turkeys I’d ever seen, so plump and firm, fresh. As Joel Salatin say’s “well exercised”, verses birds stuck in small cages, eating round-up sprayed feed laced with antibiotics . Roasting heritage breeds is different than the huge commercial turkeys, they have more muscle and less fat, so quickly roasting them at a high heat for fewer hours was recommended. We turned then three times and they baked for about two hours in the 450 brick oven. The had been brined the night before and were filled with oranges my neighbors brought up from their tree in LA and our onions. I made the croutons for the stuffing, then local celery traded for some backhoe time, onions and parsley. Bacon or sausage were the two types we made. The turkey was the best I’ve ever eaten. Support local pasture raised meat !

I had really planned the vegetable timing and the romanesqo broccoli and the lettuces, were perfect. The potatoes had looked great from above and I dreamed of letting the kids dig the potatoes for Thanksgiving dinner. I dug some up a week before to see the size of all the red potatoes I’d planted.They were covered with a scaly scab. Oh, bummer forty feet of bum potatoes, usable but ugly. But as I dug I found the fingerlings were fine . So I had to BUY some potatoes for the mashed potatoes so wonderfully made by my nephew Casey. The fingerlings were roasted with butternut squash, acorn squash, garlic and rosemary all grown here.


It was a wonderful meal. Followed by what I realized my family “does” when it has many hours together, SING . Then some impromptu acting, charades, and even some fabulous opera sung by my niece . When we were young my Dad, a self professed history buff, decided to try to remember the sea shanty’s he had heard as a child and also mixed with a large dose of Woody Guthrie. He taught himself these on the guitar and we all learned them as kids. We had an old fishing boat and would often show up at Catalina Island on the weekends. As we put down the anchor, my Dad would get out the guitar start singing, with all of us joining in, and the fancy yachts would pull up anchor and move away, leaving us with a perfect spot !

The next day Turkey sandwiches and homemade beer my brother had brewed and brought with him from Portland.

Then I made myself go on a walk, which led to a great mushroom walk all over our property, leading to a continued walk down under Hwy 1 in a tunnel and out to the ocean on the other side.

My brother in law dragged around David Aurora’s huge manual on mushrooms for the next day, looking like a preacher.


We made it to the lighthouse to see the most beautiful fall skies and ocean in turmoil. Another home grown salad and chili (our onions, home canned tomatoes, herbs and belted galloway beef from our local friend) and more bread ! for dinner.

I can’t remember when but everyone rode the horses around, led and instructed expertly by my sister the true equestrian. We had a great time. Everyone helped so much. It was fun to see what we all might do with one another when you have no TV, power, cell reception, internet access or phone. We had great fun and a wonderful visit all based around the hearth .

All the cousins cleaning up ! Thanks to my sister Heather for spending much of her Thanksgiving taking these wonderful photos.

Finding Roots


As we walked by the dining room, the sounds of thirty young men chanting “Ram Yam Kham, Om Ah Hum” with their deep resonant voices came flowing through the windows. The sound went down into my heart and I stood there shaking. We three, twenty year old girls had been trying to “find” where the men hung out in this monastery. Not understanding why these gorgeous,sensitive, burley, men weren’t looking for us . They were so different and unexpected. We had no warnings to stay away from them and had no experience of men that paid us so little mind.

Invited to Odiyan by the patron to help plant an area we had never seen before even in pictures. It was already disconcerting enough to just drive the windy coastline up, seeing almost no cars. On and on we went finally getting really scared when after an hour of no cars, a jeep drives by with about six big men in it, most with guns pointing up into the sky. Where were we ? Where were we going ? Finally a glimpse of what looked like an out of this world UFO, The white Stupa over on the hillside and some views of a shiny copper roof.

This first view of there, now thirty one years later, has stayed in my mind and the sound of the men chanting has stayed in my heart. I found my roots there and a community much like what the farming communities of old knew instinctively. How to work together, how to believe in oneself and my abilities. To gain confidence from hands on work and jobs accomplished from start to finish. Moral ethics required to live in a small community with integrity . What I was looking for in my culture, a sense of place and purpose and of participation in something larger, was all found here. But I still wonder how to instill it in my world and my children’s world now.

What we have lost through the decimation of rural culture and livelihood is enormous. No wonder teenagers are tattooing themselves and piercing their entire bodies. The world of TV, video games and texting has not given them a culture to interface with, only a cloud culture and no ground. The confidence to drive tractors and do important tasks that support the family and the communities well being. The moral character to represent their family and community. The entrepreneurial experience to start small industry and the creativity and problem solving ability necessary in rural life. America has represented this spirit
and creative, innovative genius, yet now has turned it’s back on what it takes to develop it in our culture. Come back to some ground and plant some vegetables, cook most of your meals, don’t buy processed goods shipped hundreds of miles.Teach your kids to cook and use local fresh ingredients. Buy enough from your local farmer to support their efforts. Say through your actions that you want this rural culture to be alive . Maybe we can bring back a community spirit that will inspire our children and give them the roots to succeed .

Self Sufficiency Is Hard Work

So five years into building our farm and working outside to afford our farm. Plus living a self sufficient life, living off grid while doing this. Growing the majority of our food year round . Wildcrafting for local fruit; blackberries, huckleberries made into jams and frozen for mid winter feasting. Bartering and trading for anything from salmon and local rock fish, even abalone to lamb and goat cheese also lemons and wine. Our half a beef and the wild pig Dennis shot carrying us through. I find our meals to have become more and more gourmet and inspired. Needing abundant creativity and a very diverse garden to keep the meals interesting.

More and more I read and think about traditional lifestyles in rural France and Italy. How local food markets were based on a high standard and a reputation you didn’t want to ruin by offering a lesser grade product. Our tastes here in America have been ruined by old food overly processed, too much sugar and salt, not to mention mold . It will take careful eating practices to regain our taste buds in favor of fresh foods. I noticed I wasn’t that interested in vegetables; they didn’t seem to have any flavor. My kids too now love vegetables because they are fresh and flavorful. Growing traditional heirloom varieties of vegetables and fruits, brings back subtle flavors lost in our current market produce, grown for shelf life and ship-ability.

The work day is long and hard but the richness and integrity of living this type of life is so abundant . The pay is little for what we are producing but what we need is coming and a feeling of working within a community is developing. Doing good work trying to be kind to each other is bringing us closer and we all help to make this vision develop .

Carried Away With Summer

I know I’ve written very little the last few months. Part of it is that I’m sleeping again, so no more 2am-4am writing times. The other part is this farm vision is taking effect before my eyes and it’s just so much work.

Today my husband and son-in law and the rest of us got part of the new fence up. This will increase the garden to about four acres. I’m trying to fill part of that with fruit trees, part of it with ornamental gardens, some rows of berries, then more vegetable space. I’m looking at it from an irrigation point of view. How I can run the systems and how much landscape can we reasonably water. Marketing what we produce seems to be relatively easy, so I’m trying to focus on what we like to eat and how to grow the most diversity of product to eat with year round. Also to try to grow mostly what will do well here.

These last few days have been like a farm camp here. Dennis riding three kids all piled around him on the four-wheeler. Dragging small sapling fir trees up to hatchet off the branches and hand peel the bark with a draw knife. They are all making a teepee, an authentic large sized one . Tonight our instant hot water heater washed six of our dusty bodies in a row, then did dinner dishes as well. I finally succumbed having typed the first part of this with dirt all over me and my clothes.

I feel it’s very important to include our whole family in farm and house chores. So visiting grandchildren harvested strawberries, weeded paths and then collected flower seed on their own inspiration to grow their own flower gardens at home. Helping with running errands picking food and preparing lunch out of the garden seems to make the food taste even better.Today doing a taste test of six different types of beets.Then gobbling them up in a salad .

Our freezer is full of Sherry’s cow and an extra lamb, plus lot’s of tan oak bark smoked salmon. We feel stocked for the winter. But the summer garden is going full force harvesting french filet beans, so far eating more of them in the garden than we have cooked, lettuces, spinach, beets, mizuna, peas, cauliflower, kale, potatoes, garlic, onions, leeks, broccoli, mixed greens: cucumbers, tomatoes and squash are just starting here on the coast in August. Winter vegetables are starting to go in, more potatoes, garlic, brassicas, peas, spinach, lettuces planted in the next months for winter harvest.

Since my family is coming here for Thanksgiving, I’ve been planting acorn squash, pumpkins, etc. specifically with that holiday in mind. It’s inspiring me to finish many undone projects around the ranch, hopefully many will get done. Three turkeys were ordered from http://mendoorganicscsa.com/2011/07/01/thanksgiving-christmas-turkeys/. To reserve for the holiday. My brother made the comment today, his birthday, when I called; ” You know Katie, we could always just go buy something from the store, if we need it ” . Yeah cranberry bogs just don’t grow around here, but we could dig a pond and try ? OK Ok .

Storytelling

There was a gypsy evening of storytelling and music, at a self sufficiency event I wanted to attend . I thought about a story I might tell. I didn’t end up going to the event as I did last year, since we are already living the self sufficient life ! We are so busy doing that and I didn’t want to be away a weekend when I could be working instead on one of our many projects here.

Now in my family, we are all storytellers, and we all elaborate our stories adding more stories to the original. Let’s see if I can write it as I would tell it:

People ask me why I moved into a monastery at the age of 24. It all started with a motorcycle, a Norton Commando, to be exact. I had this boyfriend at that time. he was blond I’m blond, he was a triathlete, I was riding my bike 28 miles to college each day plus swimming four + times a week at his encouragement. We got along really well. Anyway his mom gave me a piece of Christmas china for a present. A few months later , I had a vision of my life unfolding with him; the Volvo wagon, some acceptable suburban lifestyle, walking a baby in a jog stroller. I broke up with him the next day, I could not see myself living this life.

The next day I was selling my Karman Ghia and this unique looking guy in retro shades, a used army jacket and work boots drove up on ” The Motorcycle”. He was like taking a different road . He and his friends were involved with the patrons of the monastery, some of them worked as cooks or gardeners at their estate. Most were meditating. This was 1979 and I realized I had found what I’d been looking for.

To be able to work at this estate, they taught regular meditation classes, I had to either become a cook or a gardener. I decided to try my hand at gardening. I started with a small patch outside our tiny cottage ” The Guy” and I were sharing. I could just afford a few six packs of flowers, I tried delphiniums and foxgloves. These grew to the overwhelming height of ten to twelve feet tall, a rose blew in and grew and started blooming, other bulbs just came up. It seemed the earth was trying to tell me something, maybe I was good at this ? Then I turned the corner and started gardening in the next long bed, then the huge front bed, double digging it all with manure after my bakery job was done each day. Flowers started blooming abundantly everywhere. I started trading them for gelato credit at a local shop. Other stores joined in purchasing flowers.

One day the woman I admired so much at the estate garden, told me the story of the two sisters;

There were two sisters, each wanted to grow a flower garden for the fair flower show at the end of the summer. Both sisters turned their front yards into huge flower gardens. One sister would give her flowers away to whoever was coming by for a visit. The other sister wouldn’t cut any of hers trying to keep them for the fair. Well when the time for the fair came around, the sister who had given away all the flower bouquets still had lot’s of flowers, while the sister who wouldn’t cut hers had all her garden go to seed and had no more flowers. Cutting flowers helps them to grow more flowers.