Want to learn how to Graft Fruit trees ? Feb 1st

Mendocino Permaculture’s 31st Annual Winter Abundance Workshop

Saturday, February 1, 2014, from 9 am to 4 pm, rain☂ or shine ☀
at the Fairgrounds in Boonville, on Hwy 128

Seed, Scion & Cutting Exchange with Hands-on Fruit Tree Grafting

FREE TO ALL

Classes all day on fruit tree propagation, how to grow fruits & nuts, and how to do seed saving of all kinds of food plants. Learn the tricks of making your own fruit & nut bearing trees, shrubs and vines. You can make your own tree right at the event. Come spend the day with local green thumbs who understand the unique climate zones and soils of our bioregion. You can purchase an organic lunch and beverages at the event.

This is a free public service learning event. There is no charge for admission, classes, seeds, cuttings, or scion wood.

Items that will be sold: Lunch, Beverages, Tree Rootstocks, Fruit Trees & Vines.

Free classes: grafting your own fruit trees, top-working and bud grafting, cutting propagation, choosing rootstocks; planting, training, pruning, the localized holistic management perspective; seed saving for vegetables, flowers, and trees.

Seed Exchange: Seeds from local growers of vegetables, flowers, herbs and trees will be available all day, with local seed savers on hand to share local knowledge. Bring seeds to share. Labeled glass jars of bulk seed are preferred. Please label varieties by name, place, harvest date, and any pertinent cultural information. We supply seed envelopes for you to take home seeds.

Scion Exchange: Scions will be available all day, with local experts on hand to answer questions and share “local how to” knowledge. Bring scions to share. We supply over 300 varieties of fruit tree scions; also Cuttings of grape, fig, mulberry, pomegranate, currants, gooseberries, kiwi, European plums. Berries usually need a bit of root and clean soil. (See details below)

Rootstock sales: This is how we fund our free event (besides donations). We sell over 500 tree rootstocks all day of all major fruit types, for a few dollars each. We select the best rootstocks for our climate and soil so you can build your own high quality fruit trees inexpensively, by grafting your chosen scion to the right rootstock. You can also take the scions home to graft on existing fruit trees.

Plant share: everyone is welcome to use our venue to give plants away.

Trees & plants & seeds for sale by local growers, selected for our climate zone by Cool Hybrids, EastHillTop Nursery. Local vendors are welcome. Our new local seed company, Diaspora Seeds, may have seeds to sell as well.

Patrick will be selling his beautiful grafted feijoa trees, all locally tested fruiting cultivars that can not be obtained anywhere else on the planet.

Food sales by local people: the Salsitas will sell an organic lunch, and the Teen Center will sell beverages and snacks.

Schedule of Events

9:00-4:00 Open tables – Scions, seeds, cuttings and selection advice—see workshop map when you arrive

9:30 – 10:30 Class – Mark Albert on the First Level (Basic Techniques) of Making Your Own Trees & Vines

10:30 – 12:00 Class – Tim Bates of The Apple Farm on Planting, Training, Pruning and Holistic Management of Fruit Plantings

12:00 – 1:00 Lunch – Salsitas’ Organic Mexican Lunch

1:00 – 2:15 Class – Pat Schafer on Second Level (Advanced) Grafting, Budding & Topworking Techniques & Strategies

2:15 – 3:30 Class – Seed Saving Basics by Seedsaver Tom Melcher

About Scions and Cuttings
Please bring labeled scions/cuttings of your favorite trees/plants – the old local gems that we are trying to save, new varieties, and your own seedlings are also welcome. If the varietal name is unknown, just label with the scions with your name, phone, and a brief description. The best scions and cuttings are the longest, straightest, newest shoots (especially the lower half of those shoots). Cut scions 8-12” long and ziplock bag them. Free recycled ziplock bags will be available in the scion area. Cuttings for rooting should be longer, 12-24” long, bundled or bagged. Keep them damp and cold, at refrigerator temperature, like a cold spot outdoors on the north side of a building. Clean, damp new wood chips or new wood shavings are the ideal scion storage medium. Cut dormant scions on a nice January day and store them, rather than waiting until the last moment in this unpredictable season. Our dormancy period is short, so picking scions early is best.

About the Fairgrounds Venue
We have moved the event to the fairgrounds in Boonville. The classes will be in the dining hall. Scions and seeds tables will be in the Library/Arts and Crafts Building. Rootstock sales and plant exchange will be under the roof around the outside of the library building. Parking will be outside the Fairgrounds proper, in the parking lot right on Hwy 128 a few hundreds yards southeast of the Fairgrounds. Contact us for details on vehicle access via the “back parking lot” if you need to bring your vehicle in to the event for any reason. The AV Community Library will open for its regular hours.

Please bring your own plate, utensils, cups, and napkins to reduce our carbon footprint. Biodegradable sets will also be available for $1.50 each.

The Winter Abundance Workshop is co-sponsored by Anderson Valley Adult School.

For more information, call Barbara/Rob Goodell 895-3897; Mark Albert 462-7843; or Richard Jeske 459-5926. You may leave your email address by phone for an email reply.

See you there!

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Why Local Business is so Important

http://grist.org/cities/locally-owned-businesses-can-help-communities-thrive-and-survive-climate-change/

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Why Our Food is so Dependent on oil

http://www.resilience.org/stories/2005-04-01/why-our-food-so-dependent-oil

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Basic Vegetables to grow

There are easy vegetables out there that can supplement most people’s diet very happily with little effort.
My favorites for this coastal location:
1.chard
2. Kale
3. Zucchini
4. Cherry tomatoes
5. Lettuce
6. Peas
I really think the large trough planters are quite easy to irrigate and protect from predators. They are deep and can accommodate the roots of larger plants. They look lovely with mixed plants spilling over the sides. I like to have some French Thyme plants, chard, chives and kale in one. maybe pumpkins, winter squash or zucchini with nastursiums in another planter. If you are a big salad eater, one with rotating plantings of lettuce works. my good friend Jann, uses an old piece of fiberglass bent over and tucked in the edges, to create a greenhouse, in an old bathtub. Irrigation can be quite simple for these, just a drip line and some sprayers. The troughs I use are old ones that leak and I put them on the dirt, but they do leave a rust mark if you leave them on decks .

I love perennial plants, that keep working for me year after year. Asparagus, rhubarb, artichokes, arugula, thyme, chives, oregano, tarragon, sage. If you like growing simple plants and want to branch out, plant broccoli, cauliflower, beans( I love bush beans), onions, garlic, spinach, strawberries. Plant some fruit trees. A lemon in a windless, south facing spot, in good rich soil will do well here. I love apples, pears, plums, prunes all these trees can live in our coastal climate.

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Stone Soup -cooking from the garden, whatever the season

Garden in July 026
I’m afraid I’m quite boring in my use of spices, although most of the spices I use come straight from the garden. My husband and kids don’t like spicy food much or strange herbs, even curries. So my standby is a good base of fresh veggies, whatever is currently growing, plus an onion usually parsley or celery. Lately I love the herb sage especially with Chicken, Rabbit or pork. Thyme, oregano, rosemary, chives usually always fresh from the garden or ones I dried from the garden. I’m not exotic in my spice choices but it makes good home cooked food.
chard 4
Today I’m making a soup, we’ve had a week of lot’s of sickness going around, finished with me, the nursemaid getting the flu. Soup sounds really good to all of us.

My soup base today-varies with season
1 lg. onion diced
green garlic from the garden 5-6 sliced well into the green
carrots a large bunch from the garden-diced
1 lg. parsnip scrubbed- diced
parsley, stems and all-when it’s fresh the stems are delicious-1 large bunch minced
1 bunch of fresh thyme chopped
dried sage a lg. pinch
salt and pepper to taste

I always saute veggies first in my trusty cast iron skillet before adding to the soup pot
saute in 3/4 cube of butter (yes, this is a lot, you can use less, but adds lot’s of flavor)
First I add in the onions while I’m prepping the other veggies, then the garlic and the carrots, parsnip, thyme -after a saute and the onions are translucent add to soup pot

Add water- today I’m making chicken soup with either potatoes or barley or if I felt better some home made noodles. So I’ll add the organic, washed chicken- without innards- plus whatever else I’m putting in the soup
Bring to a slight boil, turn down to a simmer cook one hour, never let it boil! Take out the chicken, let it cool and take the meat off the bones. Add it back into soup- adjust seasonings. I’m going to add a large bunch of swiss chard at this point, Reheat to serving temp.

Summer canning

Summer canning


You could have also made cauliflower soup this way- pureeing the base with the potatoes. Or crispy bacon, clams and cream for clam chowder.
Or add in beef stock or wine( instead of water) and chunks of browned, floured meat for a stew. Or tomatoes sauce(instead of water), cooked white beans and sausage .

I love to cook food from our garden. You have to be creative to use what’s in season and make substitutions for recipes. But have fun with imagining what you can make. Then try to figure out how to make it from ingredients at hand. Don’t forget the bread with the soup !
IMG_0038

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Grow your own Mushrooms ! Class March 3rd 1-4pm

Workshop:

Grow Your Own Mushrooms

on Logs

With John Richardson

This workshop will teach us which hard wood logs to select, how to prepare and inoculate them with spawn plugs, which varieties of mushrooms work best, and how to take care of the logs. Each log can produce mushrooms for up to 5 years!
We will use Pearl Oyster and Shiitaki plugs.

Materials include logs, spawn plugs, sealing wax and handouts.

If you have one, bring a drill with a 5/16” bit.

John Richardson, currently of Noyo Hill Farm in Ft. Bragg, grew mushrooms commercially in Point Arena for many years.

Time: Sunday, March 3, 2013, 1pm to 4pm

Location: Gualala ridge
For directions, questions and to register call

(707) 884-3684

PRICE: $40 for the class, plus $25 for each inoculated log you want to take home.

RSVP: $20 deposit required by February 25. To RSVP call (707) 884 -3684

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The super rich

How power-mad neoliberalism trashed your life, but made the super-rich even richer…
In Around the web on January 16, 2013 at 7:33 am

From GEORGE MONBIOT
The Guardian

How they must bleed for us. In 2012, the world’s 100 richest people became $241 billion richer. They are now worth $1.9 trillion: just a little less than the GDP of the United Kingdom.

This is not the result of chance. The rise in the fortunes of the super-rich is the direct result of policies. Here are a few: the reduction of tax rates and tax enforcement; governments’ refusal to recoup a decent share of revenues from minerals and land; the privatisation of public assets and the creation of a toll-booth economy; wage liberalisation and the destruction of collective bargaining.

The policies which made the global monarchs so rich are the policies squeezing everyone else. This is not what the theory predicted. Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman and their disciples – in a thousand business schools, the IMF, the World Bank, the OECD and just about every modern government – have argued that the less governments tax the rich, defend workers and redistribute wealth, the more prosperous everyone will be. Any attempt to reduce inequality would damage the efficiency of the market, impeding the rising tide that lifts all boats. The apostles have conducted a 30-year global experiment and the results are now in. Total failure.

Before I go on, I should point out that I don’t believe perpetual economic growth is either sustainable or desirable. But if growth is your aim – an aim to which every government claims to subscribe – you couldn’t make a bigger mess of it than by releasing the super-rich from the constraints of democracy.

Last year’s annual report by the UN Conference on Trade and Development should have been an obituary for the neoliberal model developed by Hayek and Friedman and their disciples. It shows unequivocally that their policies have created the opposite outcomes to those they predicted. As neoliberal policies (cutting taxes for the rich, privatising state assets, deregulating labour, reducing social security) began to bite from the 1980s onwards, growth rates started to fall and unemployment to rise.

The remarkable growth in the rich nations during the 1950s, 60s and 70s was made possible by the destruction of the wealth and power of the elite, as a result of the Depression and the second world war. Their embarrassment gave the other 99% an unprecedented chance to demand redistribution, state spending and social security, all of which stimulated demand.

Neoliberalism was an attempt to turn back these reforms. Lavishly funded by millionaires, its advocates were amazingly successful: politically. Economically they flopped.

Throughout the OECD countries, taxation has become more regressive: the rich pay less, the poor pay more. The result, the neoliberals claimed, would be that economic efficiency and investment would rise, enriching everyone. The opposite occurred. As taxes on the rich and on business diminished, the spending power of both the state and poorer people fell, and demand contracted. The result was that investment rates declined, in step with companies’ expectations of growth.

The neoliberals also insisted that unrestrained inequality in incomes and flexible wages would reduce unemployment. But throughout the rich world both inequality and unemployment have soared. The recent jump in unemployment in most developed countries – worse than in any previous recession of the past three decades – was preceded by the lowest level of wages as a share of GDP since the second world war. Bang goes the theory. It failed for the same obvious reason: low wages suppress demand, which suppresses employment.

As wages stagnated, people supplemented their incomes with debt. Rising debt fed the deregulated banks, with consequences of which we are all aware. The greater inequality becomes, the UN report finds, the less stable the economy and the lower its rates of growth. The policies with which neoliberal governments seek to reduce their deficits and stimulate their economies are counter-productive.

The impending reduction of the UK’s top rate of income tax (from 50% to 45%) will not boost government revenue or private enterprise, but it will enrich the speculators who tanked the economy: Goldman Sachs and other banks are now thinking of delaying their bonus payments to take advantage of it. The welfare bill approved by parliament last week will not help to clear the deficit or stimulate employment: it will reduce demand, suppressing economic recovery. The same goes for the capping of public sector pay. “Relearning some old lessons about fairness and participation,” the UN says, “is the only way to eventually overcome the crisis and pursue a path of sustainable economic development.”

As I say, I have no dog in this race, except a belief that no one, in this sea of riches, should have to be poor. But staring dumbfounded at the lessons unlearned in Britain, Europe and the United States, it strikes me that the entire structure of neoliberal thought is a fraud. The demands of the ultra-rich have been dressed up as sophisticated economic theory and applied regardless of the outcome. The complete failure of this world-scale experiment is no impediment to its repetition. This has nothing to do with economics. It has everything to do with power.

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